Holes in the Map

Holes in the map, part 6: Wildcat

In part 6 of our series about the Lake District’s missing wildlife, Site Manager Lee Schofield writes about wildcats, a species that was common in our woods and fells until surprisingly recently. Somewhere between the muddy wild boars and the grumpy looking eagle owls at the Lake District Wildlife Park sits a wood and wire enclosure with a tangle of pine branches inside. If you look long enough, you might… Read More »Holes in the map, part 6: Wildcat

Holes in the map, part 5: Pine Marten

In the fifth installment of the series about specices missing from the Lake District, Site Manager Lee Schofield focuses on one of our most elusive native predators, the pine marten. At five o’clock in the morning, I crept downstairs with my early-rising son, hoping not to wake my wife and daughter sleeping above. We snuck into the living room of our holiday cottage on the shore of Loch Linhe, keeping… Read More »Holes in the map, part 5: Pine Marten

Holes in the map, part 4: Water Vole

The fourth part of the series focusing on species missing from the Lake District, Site Manager Lee Schofield looks for water voles. For aeons, The Lake District and its abundance of lakes, becks, tarns, ditches, bogs and ponds was heaven for water voles, one of the UK’s most endearing small mammals. Made famous by the affable and breezy character of Ratty in The Wind in the Willows, water vole’s relationship… Read More »Holes in the map, part 4: Water Vole

Holes in the map, part 2: Corncrake

RSPB Haweswater Site Manager, Lee Schofield, explores the demise of a species which, until very recently, embodied British farmland. Discover how the return of traditional practices and nature-minded farming could be the key to the return of the Corncrake in Cumbria.